PHOL: Person High on Life

“Stick to your knitting.”

That’s the sage advice London, Ont. Mayor Joni Baechler, a 14-year political veteran, says she once received from one of her male city council counterparts.

“Seriously,” Baechler says, sitting inside Calgary’s municipal building and still somewhat incredulous as she recounts the unsolicited advice.

Needless to say, Baechler ignored her colleague’s instruction and hopes other women will, too, because Canadian politics desperately requires a recalibration.

“When you don’t have equal representation from the female voice we know unequivocally that the perspective a women … doesn’t even make it to the table,” she says.

Baechler is in Calgary for the Tuesday morning screening of 25%: A Documentary, a 37-minutes film showcasing a uniquely Canadian perspective on the lack of and need for more women in politics.

yinyinbaby:

xxxshakespearexxx:

The Empress of China 武则天 Wu Zetian

Fan Bing Bing 范冰冰 @ Aarif 李治廷

http://www.ancientchinese.net/index.php?topic=1129.0

I WANT TO WATCH THIS SO BADLYYYYYY

It is hard to get comfortable people to do anything when it might cost them their comfort.
Trickster’s Queen, Tamora Pierce (via fytortall)
Oct. 20 3:15 pm
allthecanadianpolitics:

Nearly All Chinese and South Asian British Columbians Have Faced Discrimination

In a groundbreaking survey of 658 Chinese and South Asian British Columbians conducted by Insights West through the Your Insights Multicultural Panel, more than four-in-five respondents say they have faced some form of discrimination as a result of their ethnicity.
The online survey of a representative sample from the recently launched Your Insights Multicultural Panel shows that only 16% of Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have not experienced discrimination as a result of their ethnicity. More than half (56%) have experienced a “small amount” of discrimination, while 6% describe the discrimination they have encountered as “significant” and a further 19% deem it “moderate.”
South Asian British Columbians are more likely to report experiencing “significant” or “moderate” discrimination (36%) than Chinese British Columbians (22%).
“In our first-ever survey of its kind, we were surprised to find that a significant number of Chinese and South Asians have experienced discrimination at some point in their lives here,” says Steve Mossop, President of Insights West. “The good news is that the majority have experienced only small amounts but, still, to have a quarter of this segment of the population experience a moderate or significant amount is not something that our society should be proud of.”
Most Chinese and South Asian British Columbians (56%) say they have suffered stereotyping “frequently” or “sometimes” as a result of their ethnicity, while about a third have endured poor customer service (36%) or been the subject of a racial joke (33%).
More than one-in-four Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” been excluded from consideration as dating prospects (28%), been excluded from social groups (also 28%), were verbally harassed (27%), were subject to name calling and racial slurs (26%), or were mocked or ridiculed (also 26%) because of their ethnicity.
In addition, 28% of Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” lost a potential employment opportunity because of their ethnicity, while 24% claim to have been treated unfairly in the workplace.

Significantly fewer Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” encountered violence or physical harassment (11%), been denied goods and services (9%), or were denied facilities and accommodation (also 9%) because of their ethnicity.
Chinese and South Asian British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have faced unfair treatment in the workplace (34%) than their younger counterparts. Also, South Asians are also more likely to cite discrimination at the workplace (28%) than Chinese (23%).
There is a sizeable gender gap on the question related to exclusion from consideration as a dating prospect. While more than a third of male Chinese and South Asian British Columbians (37%) say they have experienced this type of discrimination, the proportion is decidedly lower for their female counterparts (19%).
About this Release:
Results are based on an online study conducted in August and September 2014 among 658 Chinese and South Asian British Columbians aged 18+ who are Your Insights Multicultural panel members. Your Insights Multicultural Panel is a market research online community of 2,100+ British Columbians of Chinese and South Asian ethnic heritage, where the opinions of this diverse and growing segment of the population can be properly assessed. While statistical margins of error are arguably not applicable to online panels/online studies of this nature, we have assumed that the same margins of error apply as if it were a true unweighted random probability sample with a margin of error of +/- 3.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. Click here to view the detailed data tabulations for this study.
For further information, please contact:
Steve MossopPresident, Insights West778-891-4762stevemossop@insightswest.com

allthecanadianpolitics:

Nearly All Chinese and South Asian British Columbians Have Faced Discrimination

In a groundbreaking survey of 658 Chinese and South Asian British Columbians conducted by Insights West through the Your Insights Multicultural Panel, more than four-in-five respondents say they have faced some form of discrimination as a result of their ethnicity.

The online survey of a representative sample from the recently launched Your Insights Multicultural Panel shows that only 16% of Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have not experienced discrimination as a result of their ethnicity. More than half (56%) have experienced a “small amount” of discrimination, while 6% describe the discrimination they have encountered as “significant” and a further 19% deem it “moderate.”

South Asian British Columbians are more likely to report experiencing “significant” or “moderate” discrimination (36%) than Chinese British Columbians (22%).

“In our first-ever survey of its kind, we were surprised to find that a significant number of Chinese and South Asians have experienced discrimination at some point in their lives here,” says Steve Mossop, President of Insights West. “The good news is that the majority have experienced only small amounts but, still, to have a quarter of this segment of the population experience a moderate or significant amount is not something that our society should be proud of.”

Most Chinese and South Asian British Columbians (56%) say they have suffered stereotyping “frequently” or “sometimes” as a result of their ethnicity, while about a third have endured poor customer service (36%) or been the subject of a racial joke (33%).

More than one-in-four Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” been excluded from consideration as dating prospects (28%), been excluded from social groups (also 28%), were verbally harassed (27%), were subject to name calling and racial slurs (26%), or were mocked or ridiculed (also 26%) because of their ethnicity.

In addition, 28% of Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” lost a potential employment opportunity because of their ethnicity, while 24% claim to have been treated unfairly in the workplace.

Significantly fewer Chinese and South Asian British Columbians say they have “frequently” or “sometimes” encountered violence or physical harassment (11%), been denied goods and services (9%), or were denied facilities and accommodation (also 9%) because of their ethnicity.

Chinese and South Asian British Columbians aged 55 and over are more likely to have faced unfair treatment in the workplace (34%) than their younger counterparts. Also, South Asians are also more likely to cite discrimination at the workplace (28%) than Chinese (23%).

There is a sizeable gender gap on the question related to exclusion from consideration as a dating prospect. While more than a third of male Chinese and South Asian British Columbians (37%) say they have experienced this type of discrimination, the proportion is decidedly lower for their female counterparts (19%).

About this Release:

Results are based on an online study conducted in August and September 2014 among 658 Chinese and South Asian British Columbians aged 18+ who are Your Insights Multicultural panel members. Your Insights Multicultural Panel is a market research online community of 2,100+ British Columbians of Chinese and South Asian ethnic heritage, where the opinions of this diverse and growing segment of the population can be properly assessed. While statistical margins of error are arguably not applicable to online panels/online studies of this nature, we have assumed that the same margins of error apply as if it were a true unweighted random probability sample with a margin of error of +/- 3.8 percentage points, nineteen times out of twenty. Click here to view the detailed data tabulations for this study.

For further information, please contact:

Steve Mossop
President, Insights West
778-891-4762
stevemossop@insightswest.com

popculturesavvyangel:

*WHIRLS SNAPE OUT OF THE WAY*

DID YOU 

*SHOVES MINERVA INTO A WALL*

PUT YOUR NAME

*KNOCKS OVER A TABLE AGGRESSIVELY* 

IN THE GOBLET

*GRABS HARRY AND SLAMS HIM INTO THE WALL*

OF FIRE!?!?!?1111?!?!111321I3591130583FERGEKLJRKGJ GRLGJWRLKGVJLKJ G” Dumbledore asked calmly.

allaboutrings:

Pisces Fish Skull Zodiac Ring
https://www.etsy.com/listing/162665529/pisces-fish-skull-zodiac-ring-collection?ref=shop_home_active_23
jeannepompadour:

Austrian Gothic style bracelet,  c. 1870

jeannepompadour:

Austrian Gothic style bracelet,  c. 1870